French Open 2021: Krejcikova here to stay as doubles star learns to love singles scene

France’s own Mary Pierce was the most recent player to clinch singles and doubles titles in the same year at Roland Garros, beating Conchita Martinez in the 2000 singles final and teaming up with Martina Hingis to make it a twin trophy success.

On Saturday, Krejcikova can complete the first leg of her weekend’s objective as she battles to become only the second woman playing under a Czech flag to triumph in singles at the Paris clay-court Grand Slam in the Open Era, after Hana Mandlikova’s 1981 victory.

Krejcikova hails Novotna influence as Czech doubles expert reaches singles final

Martina Navratilova won the French Open title twice, in 1982 and 1984, but by that stage she was representing the United States, having previously been a runner-up for Czechoslovakia in 1975.

A world-class doubles star, Krejcikova has rocketed up the singles rankings in the past 18 months, having ended 2019 at 135th on the WTA list. Now up to a career-high 33rd, victory over Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova on Court Philippe Chatrier would lift her to 15th.

French Open: Pavlyuchenkova reaches maiden grand slam final

Speaking on Friday, Krejcikova suggested the pandemic, and the enforced deceleration of the tennis tours, had given her the time to mix up her singles and doubles schedules when previously her diary was overly packed.

The 25-year-old had been playing lower-tier ITF singles events but main-tour WTA doubles, and it had been a difficult juggling act.

“I hope there will be no more ITFs in singles for me,” Krejcikova said. “I want to stay on this level. I want to really work hard just to stay here, to be able to play such matches like this. It was really tough playing ITFs because the schedule, the WTA in doubles, the schedule was tough. It was tight.

“Sometimes we played well, then I missed the tournament, then I wasn’t ready to play. It was difficult. But I really think that the pandemic really helped me.

“Right now I just want to keep the level. I don’t want to go backwards.”

Should she and Katerina Siniakova win the doubles on Sunday, when last year’s singles champion Iga Swiatek and American Bethanie Mattek-Sands should provide tough opposition, it would mean Krejcikova goes back to number one in those rankings.

Krejcikova has a 14-3 singles record on clay this season, with only two WTA players winning more matches on the surface (Paula Badosa 17-3, Coco Gauff 16-4)

She will hope to become just the third unseeded women’s singles champion in French Open history, after Swiatek (2020) and Jelena Ostapenko (2017).

After teaming up with Siniakova to scuttle Magda Linette and Bernarda Perra 6-1 6-2 in their doubles semi-final on Friday, Krejcikova said: “I hope we saved some power for the finals.

“I’m looking forward that I’m going to play two more times on Chatrier. It’s always perfect to play this court because it’s a beautiful court. I think it’s going to be a lot of fun playing these two finals.”

Pavlyuchenkova is three weeks away from turning 30 and would become the third-oldest first-time grand slam winner on the women’s tour, after Flavia Pennetta (33 years 200 days, 2015 US Open) and Ann Jones (30 years 261 days, 1969 Wimbledon).

She would also become the oldest Russian woman to win a singles major, taking that statistic away from Maria Sharapova who was 27 when she scooped her fifth and final slam in 2014 at Roland Garros.

Sitting 32nd in the rankings, she would jump to 14th by taking the title but is guaranteed to jump back into the top 20, for the first time since January 2018.

Pavlyuchenkova banished her grand slam quarter-final jinx this week, having lost all six of her previous last-eight singles matches at that stage in grand slams, including a 2011 loss to Francesca Schiavone at Roland Garros. She will hope her first trek beyond the quarters is not her last.

“It’s been a long road. It’s been a lot of ups and downs. It’s been a tough one,” said Pavlyuchenkova, who is playing in her 52nd grand slam.

“I definitely didn’t expect this year being in the final. I guess you can’t expect those things. I was just there working hard, doing everything possible. I just said to myself, ‘You know what, this year let’s do whatever it takes, anything you can do to improve your game, your mentality’.

“I started working with a sports psychologist, everything. I wanted to give it a try so I have no regrets after. That’s it.”

One thing is for sure: a new Grand Slam champion is about to be crowned, and Paris is used to that. The past five Roland Garros champions have all been new to the slam-winning experience, with Garbine Muguruza’s maiden major in 2016 followed by breakthroughs for Ostapenko, Simona Halep, Ash Barty and Swiatek.

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